Rick Santorum Suspends Presidential Campaign

With his wife Karen (R) and daughter Sarah at his side Republican presidential candidate, former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum speaks during a campaign rally on April 1, 2012 in Mishicot, Wisconsin

Rick Santorum is suspending his campaign for the GOP presidential nomination.
Santorum spoke to reporters Tuesday afternoon in Gettysburg, Pa, recounting tales of the people he has gotten to know in the campaign.
“Thank God for what you’ve given not just me and to our family,” he said, talking in the past tense about his “improbable” campaign for the White House. “But you’ve given a voice in many cases to those who are voiceless.”
Santorum opened by thanking people for their prayers for his youngest daughter, Bella, who was hospitalized on Friday and released last night.
Her condition “caused us to think … about the role we have as as parents,” Santorum said, adding that the weekend was a time for “prayer and thought” about his future.
Santorum’s campaign was tight-lipped about the candidate’s future before the event, but there were signs that the end could be coming. The conference room reserved for the event was small and there were last-minute cancellations of other events in the state.
Santorum’s decision marks the end of an unpredictable ride for the former Pennsylvania senator, who was seen as having little chance for the White House more than a year ago when he launched his bid.
Despite primary victories in several states, Santorum has been unable to translate votes from Tea Party members, the most conservative voters, and evangelicals into a coalition that could sustain him.
Long a favorite of social conservatives, Santorum appealed to voters with his view that the federal government under President Obama was trampling on the rights of people – whether it was through the national health care law or a proposed rule that would have required religious institutions to provide access to contraceptives.
He and Newt Gingrich were viewed as competing for the same voters, but Santorum in recent weeks ignored the former House speaker as he pushed his campaign as being the “consistent conservative” alternative to Mitt Romney.
Santorum’s rise to the final four GOP presidential candidates was unlikely, especially since he had lost his 2006 re-election bid as a Pennsylvania senator by more than 17 percentage points.
Despite being underfunded and in low single-digits in most national polls for much of 2011, Santorum concentrated on meeting Iowa voters in small groups so he could do well in the first-in-the-nation caucuses. His surprise showing in Iowa — after weeks of vote counting he was declared the winner by a tiny margin — positioned him as a viable candidate, and the sweater vests that he wore while campaigning became a symbol of his success.
A few weeks later, Santorum scored a surprise political hat trick, winning the caucuses in Colorado, Minnesota and Missouri. It was a blow for Romney, who had invested time on the ground and on the airwaves in Colorado and Minnesota.
Santorum, however, was later outgunned by the better-funded Romney and the super PAC supporting the former Massachusetts governor in key battleground states such as Ohio and Michigan. Despite recent victories in Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana, Santorum has been unable to gain much on Romney’s big lead in the delegates needed for the GOP nomination.
At times, Santorum was derailed at critical junctures in the campaign by his own remarks. Before the Michigan primary, it was his comment that President Obama is a “snob” for wanting “everybody to go to college.” Ahead of the Illinois primary, Santorum said he didn’t care about the unemployment rate. In March, Santorum had to explain that he would vote for the GOP nominee after suggesting President Obama would be a better choice than Romney.
Santorum’s wife, Karen, and the couple’s older children were ever present on the campaign trail and at election-night parties. Santorum suspended campaigning at least three times since last year because of the health of his youngest daughter, Bella, who suffers from Trisomy 18.
Trisomy 18, also known as Edwards syndrome, is caused by the presence of all or part of an extra 18th chromosome. There is a low rate of survival with the genetic disorder, and Santorum has often talked about how 3-year-old Bella was not expected to live past her first birthday.

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About KAYCEE WEEZY!

I am somewhat of a geek!

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